ST GILES – CRADDOCK & BUCKLE MEMORIAL WINDOW

The window celebrates the jubilee in 1958 of the extension of the church and shows St Giles’ as it was before and after 1898. West Bridgford was, until 1827, in the diocese of York, but looked to Southwell Minster as its “mother church”. It was dedicated on 10th July 1960.1

The window is in two main lights with, above, the arms of the see of Canterbury.

On the left, at the top is St Paulinus, who was the first Bishop of York and is reputed to be the founder of Southwell Minster. Underneath are the arms of the Diocese of York and a depiction of York Minster over the words “York Minster”. Below is an early depiction of St Giles’ church, with the words “West Bridgford” above and “1238  1898” below. There is then a shield showing a deer, pierced by an arrow, referring to the story of St Giles. At the foot are the words “In memory of FLORENCE MARY CRADDOCK who died 23rd February 1953 also her husband ALBERT JOHN CRADDOCK who died 12th December 1940 and also ROY BUCKLE their nephew killed in air operations 27th November 1943”.

Florence Mary Glanfield married Albert John Craddock in 1918. Roy Buckle was the son of Florence’s sister, Doris.

Mr Craddock was a member of Messrs Boots staff for 37 years. He began as a branch assistant, and later became branch inspector in the No. 2 Department. From 1921 until his retirement in 1933 he was head of the inventory department, which controlled the stocktaking in all branches of the firm. He had been a regular worshipper at St Giles’.2

Sergeant Roy Buckle was flight engineer on board a Halifax bomber which took off from Pocklington late on 25th November 1943 to bomb a target in Frankfurt. The following morning, the aircraft crashed at Warter Priory as it returned to Pocklington. Buckle was one of the three crew, out of a total of seven, who died in the crash. (Note: the date of death given in the dedication is incorrect.)3 He was just nineteen years old and, within ten days of commencing operational flights, had made three trips over Germany in a night bomber. He was buried in Margate cemetery.4

On the right of the window is Archbishop Thomas, from Bayeux, who built the nave of Southwell Minster. Underneath are the arms of the Southwell Diocese and a depiction of Southwell Minster over the words “Southwell Minster”. Below is a modern depiction of St Giles’ church, with the words “West Bridgford” above and “1898  1958” below. There is then a shield showing a tree and river, which is similar to the arms of Nottinghamshire County Council. At the foot are the words, “IT SHALL BE A JUBILEE UNTO YOU. REMEMBER OUR BENEFACTORS.”

References
1. St Giles’ Parish Magazine June 1960
2. Nottingham Evening Post 13th December 1940
3. www.lostaircraft.com
4. Margate Civic Society

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